Fort George

During the War of 1812, Fort George served as the headquarters for the Centre Division of the British Army. These forces included British regulars, local militia, aboriginal warriors, and Runchey's corps of freed slaves. Major General Sir Isaac Brock, "the saviour of Upper Canada" served here until his death at the Battle of Queenston Heights in October, 1812. Brock and his aide-de-camp John Macdonell were initially buried within the fort.

Fort George was destroyed by American artillery fire and captured during the Battle of Fort George in May 1813. The U.S. forces used the fort as a base to invade the rest of Upper Canada, however, they were repulsed at the Battles of Stoney Creek and Beaver Dams. After a seven month occupation, the fort was retaken in December and remained in British hands for the remainder of the war.

After the war, the fort was partially rebuilt, and by the 1820's it was falling into ruins. It was finally abandoned in favour of a more strategic installation at Fort Mississauga and a more protected one at Butler's Barracks.

Click to visit the Fort George National Park website.

 

Distance from Greystone Manor:

20.4 km

Driving time:

26 minutes

 

Niagara Nature Trails

A hike into the Niagara Glen is like a trip back in time as you wander past boulders left behind as the falls eroded through this area thousands of years ago. The Niagara Glen is home to an amazing variety of plants and animals, including rare and endangered species. Stairs lead to four kilometers of trails that wind their way through the Carolinian forest. The seven separate marked trails throughout the Niagara Glen offer spectacular views of the Niagara River, and the American side of the gorge.

 

Within the Glen you can explore Wintergreen Flats, Wilson Terrace, and Foster's Flats - theNiagara Glen Terraces, flat areas created when the Niagara River flowed through this area six to seven thousand years ago.

 

The Niagara Glen overlooks the Niagara River Whirlpool. The gorge and whirlpool were also created about six to seven thousand years ago as the Niagara River slowly eroded its way through the Niagara Escarpment. Harder, more resistant bedrock forced a right-angle turn in the river's path at the site of the Whirlpool, where the rushing waters are forced into a deep counter-clockwise spin.

 

The Niagara Glen is definitely worth a visit for hiking enthusiasts, but it should be noted that the terrain is steep and rugged, and proper footwear is required.

Welland Canal & Lock Museum

The St Lawrence River and the five Great Lakes constitute the greatest inland waterway in the world. From the Atlantic Ocean it extends 3700 kilometers (2300 miles) into the very heart of North America, forming a vital commercial shipping route. The only problem, a major obstacle called Niagara Falls prevents ships from sailing between Lakes Erie and Ontario. The solution: the Welland Canal, by-passing the Falls and lifting vessels over the Niagara Escarpment.

You won't get any closer to a Great Lakes ship unless you're a sailor yourself! See ships from around the world - UP CLOSE - as they navigate Lock 3 on their way through the St. Lawrence Seaway System. The Observation deck is always FREE. Step inside the Lock 3 centre for a fascinating look at the history and engineering behind the Canal that opened up North America's industrial heartland.

For more information visit their website:http://www.thoroldtourism.ca/canal.html


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Distance from Greystone Manor:

17.3 km

Driving time:

21 minutes

 

 

 

MacKenzie Printery and Museum

The Best Hands-on Museum in Upper Canada The restored home of rebel publisher William Lyon Mackenzie reveals 500 years of printing technology, amid the authentic ambiance of a period print shop.

Rarest in the museum's collection is the Louis Roy Press, oldest in Canada and one of the few original wooden presses remaining in the world! A hands-on experience is encouraged with a working linotype and 8 operating heritage presses.

Check out their official website: www.mackenzieprintery.org

 

Distance from Greystone Manor:

10.1 km

Driving time:

14 minutes

Laura Secord's Homestead

During the war of 1812, a brave woman set out on a perilous journey in the service of her country, and stepped forever into the history and folklore of Niagara. Travel back in time to her lovingly restored homestead and be enchanted by stories of her adventures and surroundings as interpreted by authentically costumed guides.

Guided tours are provided by qualified costumed interpreters, providing information about this historic house and the history of the area. Light refreshments, ice cream, Laura Secord chocolates and a selection of quality souvenirs are available. The year is 1812. You're far from home in the unknown wilds of Upper Canada. The place is Fort Erie and war is in the air. All around you are the exciting sights and sounds of men preparing for battle. Step back into a time of red coats, black powder and gray fortress walls. Over 200 years of living history resides within, at Old Fort Erie.

Check out their official website: www.niagaraparks.com/heritage-trail/laura-secord-homestead.html

 

Distance from Greystone Manor:

10.2 km

Driving time:

14 minutes

Fort Erie

The year is 1812. You're far from home in the unknown wilds of Upper Canada. The place is Fort Erie and war is in the air. All around you are the exciting sights and sounds of men preparing for battle. Step back into a time of red coats, black powder and gray fortress walls. Over 200 years of living history resides within, at Old Fort Erie.

Check out their official website: www.niagaraparks.com/old-fort-erie/index.html

 

Distance from Greystone Manor:

34.6 km

Driving time (scenic or direct):

46 minutes
or
33 minutes

Brock's Monument

At the entrance to this historic Park you will be greeted by carpet bedding displays, along with formalized annual bedding schemes that surround both the Brock and Laura Secord Monuments.

Nestled high atop the Niagara Escarpment, this is the birthplace of Niagara Falls - garden and nature lovers, hikers and picnickers have used this park for generations.

Facilities include two picnic pavilions, washrooms, children's splash pad, tennis courts, a bandshell, snack bar, children's playground and fine dining at Queenston Heights Restaurant with its award-winning VQA wine cellar.

Queenston Heights Park is also a terminus point of the Bruce Trail, which winds it way northward over several hundred kilometers to Tobermory. This trail passes through the Niagara Escarpment, which has been recognized as a world biosphere by U.N.E.S.C.O. Finally, Parks Canada oversees the operation of Brock Monument and also has a walking tour of the historic sites associated with this important battleground.

Visit their official website atwww.niagaraparks.com/garden/qh_park.php

 

Distance from Greystone Manor:

9.0 km

Driving time:

12 minutes